Girl Scout Council Honors Local Girls with Prestigious Gold and Silver Awards

by staff

Girl Scouts Carolinas Peaks to Piedmont (GSCP2P) recently announced that 11 girls from Forsyth County received Gold awards and 38 girls received Silver awards during the 2015-2016 troop year. 2016 marks the 100th Anniversary of the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest achievement in Girl Scouting.

gold award winners
gold award winners

The Girl Scout Gold Award, which started in 1916 as the Golden Eaglet, has always been about girls improving the community around them, sharing their ideas and passions to leave a lasting mark to make the world a better place.

Today, girls who earn the Girl Scout Gold Award show their true commitment, leadership ability, time management, dedication and initiative by completing a minimum of 80 hours toward a service project in their community that is sustainable for years to come. This year, the 89 Gold Award recipients in Peaks to Piedmont troops collectively contributed a minimum of 7,120 hours, which the council credits with a monetary value of $155,785.60 based on the 2015 Independent Sector’s estimated value of volunteer time at $21.88 per hour for North Carolina.

“In Girl Scouts, girls don’t just talk about change – they step up and take action by earning their Gold Award and make the world a better place on a personal, community, state, national or international level,” said Girl Scouts Carolinas Peaks to Piedmont Chief Executive Officer Lane Cook. “We are so very proud of these remarkable young women and are amazed by their ambition, commitment and good will.”

girl scout logoThe various Gold Award projects benefit all ages, as well as a variety of populations including churches, schools and local organizations and companies. For example, one girl designed and built a fitness trail for the community; one girl provided technology training to seniors, teaching them how to use laptops and iPads; one girl organized a summer science camp for middle school girls to introduce them to STEM; while another girl worked in partnership with Project Okurase, Ghana to promote child literacy.

These projects not only help our communities, but also benefit the girls who put so much time and effort into making them a reality. Earning the Girl Scout Gold Award sets girls apart in the college admissions process, helps them earn college scholarships and even promotes them in ranking when entering the military. The life skills and vision girls receive when earning the Girl Scout Gold Award stay with them for a lifetime.

  • Mackenzie Brown, Kernersville
  • Morgan Elizabeth Rothrock, Lewisville
  • Brianna Pilcher, Pfafftown
  • Bailey Taylor, Tobaccoville
  • Christina Gabrielle Banks, Winston Salem
  • Gibson Caudill, Winston Salem
  • Mary Chaves, Winston Salem
  • Sarah Joyce,Winston Salem
  • Elizabeth Memory Mitchell, Winston Salem
  • Alexandra Anne Rieker, Winston Salem
  • Sarah Elizabeth Watkins, Winston Salem
girl scouts
girl scouts

In addition to the Gold award, Girl Scouts Carolinas Peaks to Piedmont has awarded Forsyth County girls with the Girl Scout Silver Award- the second highest award a Girl Scout can achieve.

Girl Scout Cadettes in grades 6-8 who earn the Girl Scout Silver Award complete a minimum of 50 hours toward a service project that betters their community and leaves a lasting impact on those around them. Girls work in small groups or individually to design and execute the project, building life skills, exploring careers, gaining leadership abilities and committing to self-improvement along the way.

This year, the 223 Silver Award recipients collectively contributed a minimum of 11,150 hours, which the council credits with a monetary value of $243,962 based on the2015 Independent Sector’s estimated value of volunteer time at $21.88 per hour for North Carolina.

“The Girl Scout Silver Award projects leave behind a legacy the girls can be proud of,” said Lane Cook, chief executive officer of Girl Scouts Carolinas Peaks to Piedmont. “It teaches our girls to become effective leaders, putting their skills into action to provide services and opportunities for people in their communities.”

  • Mia DeJong, Clemmons
  • Faith Fleming, Clemmons
  • Nichole Mattacchione, Clemmons
  • Kelly Nesser, Clemmons
  • Kaleigh O’Harrah, Clemmons
  • Brylie Branham, Kernersville
  • Kayte Evans, Kernersville
  • Marrianna Flores, Kernersville
  • Zoe Howard, Kernersville
  • Chloe May, Kernersville
  • Nia Perry, Kernersville
  • Cynthia Vandervelde, Kernersville
  • Ashley Vroom, Kernersville
  • Kaley Wood, Kernersville
  • Abbilee Jackson, King
  • Emily Cav,e Rural Hall
  • Katie Flanagan, Rural Hall
  • Laura Ballard, Winston Salem
  • Meredith Bunting, Winston Salem
  • Sydney Daukas, Winston Salem
  • Hannah Davies, Winston Salem
  • Avery High, Winston Salem
  • Sophia Iltis, Winston Salem
  • Sunnie Li, Winston Salem
  • Cayle Manning, Winston Salem
  • Adonyah Mouzon, Winston Salem
  • Molly Mullane, Winston Salem
  • Rachel Nicholson, Winston Salem
  • Audrey Patrick, Winston Salem
  • Alysia Quinones, Winston Salem
  • Lillia Reed, Winston Salem
  • Jenna Robbin, Winston Salem
  • Jacqueline Sparnicht, Winston Salem
  • Katherine Sturkie Winston Salem
  • Kelly Templeton, Winston Salem
  • Beatriz Thomas, Winston Salem
  • Hannah Treglia, Winston Salem
  • Sara Trollinger, Winston Salem

girl scout logoGirl Scouts Carolinas Peaks to Piedmont, a United Way agency, is one of 112 councils nationwide chartered by Girl Scouts of the USA to deliver Girl Scout program within specific geographic boundaries. If you’d like to learn more about Girl Scouts Carolinas Peaks to Piedmont, visit their website HERE